Two Common Sales Page Leaks

We’ve been talking about linking on your website, and specifically what I call “leaks” on your sales page. We’ve been talking about linking on your website, and specifically what I call “leaks” on your sales page.

Links from your website to other related websites are almost as important as inbound links to your websites from other sites.

Just not on your sales page.

That’s because on your sales page, your readers are on track to making a purchase. You really don’t want to give them an excuse to change their mind.

I look at it this way (and you should, too): Everyone’s always in a hurry. So readers of any website are always impatiently asking themselves “Stay or go??? Stay or go??? Stay or go???”

All the time.

So if you give them any reason to go — a link to another site, or another page on your own site, perhaps — then they’re likely to take it.

Certainly not all of them, but many of them.

That’s why you should watch out for leaks. Here are two of the most common:

* Testimonials

Having a testimonial on your website is an excellent way to add creditiblity to your website, and help your visitors understand more easily how your product will benefit them. (The testimonials have to be real and true, of course.) But too often, people put testimonials on a page, and as a Thank You gesture to the person who gave the testimonial, they’ll include a link to that person’s website.

Now, there’s nothing wrong at all with including the person’s credentials (ie “Doctor of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University”) or even their website (ie “www.HopkinsMedicine.com”) but don’t make it a link. (ie www.HopkinsMedicine.com).

* Page Menu

I remember the first time I put up a “squeeze page” many years ago (a squeeze page is a page designed to get people to subscribe or “opt in” to a mailing list in exchange for some free information) I put it right on the website, with the site’s regular menu and all the other links it had on it.

As a result, people would come to this squeeze page and … not subscribe.

They’d find some other reason to look at some other page on my site, rather than opting into my mailing list.

Well, the same holds true for your sales page. You’re better off limiting — or eliminating — your regular website’s menu on your sales page.

Can you think of other leaks on your sales page?

If you can, write a comment below on the blog.

By the way, if you don’t think that links on your sales page are working against you, just check your website’s statistics.

Any good statistics program should tell you where people come from, and where they’re going on your site. And, if you don’t have a statistics program, well WHY NOT?

Install Google Analytics!

This month, in the Money Maker’s Coaching Club, I’ll be showing you how to install Analytics in under 10 minutes.

Check out this month’s webinar schedule in the Coaching Club. And if you’re not yet a member, try out the club now for just a dollar.

To Your Success,

–Mark Widawer

Links from your website to other related websites are almost as important as inbound links to your websites from other sites.  

Just not on your sales page.  

That’s because on your sales page, your readers are on track to making a purchase. You really don’t want to give them an excuse to change their mind.  

I look at it this way (and you should, too): Everyone’s always in a hurry. So readers of any website are always impatiently asking themselves “Stay or go??? Stay or go??? Stay or go???” 

All the time.  

So if you give them any reason to go — a link to another site, or another page on your own site, perhaps — then they’re likely to take it.  

Certainly not all of them, but many of them.  

That’s why you should watch out for leaks. Here are two of the most common: 

* Testimonials 

Having a testimonial on your website is an excellent way to add creditiblity to your website, and help your visitors understand more easily how your product will benefit them. (The testimonials have to be real and true, of course.) But too often, people put testimonials on a page, and as a Thank You gesture to the person who gave the testimonial, they’ll include a link to that person’s website.  

Now, there’s nothing wrong at all with including the person’s credentials (ie “Doctor of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University”) or even their website (ie “www.HopkinsMedicine.com”) but don’t make it a link. (ie www.HopkinsMedicine.com).  

* Page Menu 

I remember the first time I put up a “squeeze page” many years ago (a squeeze page is a page designed to get people to subscribe or “opt in” to a mailing list in exchange for some free information) I put it right on the website, with the site’s regular menu and all the other links it had on it.  

As a result, people would come to this squeeze page and … not subscribe.  

They’d find some other reason to look at some other page on my site, rather than opting into my mailing list.  

Well, the same holds true for your sales page. You’re better off limiting — or eliminating — your regular website’s menu on your sales page. 

Can you think of other leaks on your sales page?  

If you can, write a comment below on the blog.  

By the way, if you don’t think that links on your sales page are working against you, just check your website’s statistics.  

Any good statistics program should tell you where people come from, and where they’re going on your site. And, if you don’t have a statistics program, well WHY NOT?  

Install Google Analytics!

This month, in the Money Maker’s Coaching Club, I’ll be showing you how to install Analytics in under 10 minutes.  

Check out this month’s webinar schedule in the Coaching Club. And if you’re not yet a member, try out the club now for just a dollar.  

To Your Success,

–Mark Widawer 

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